Just Say No

Admittedly, at the end of the day, the only thing that seems appealing is chocolate and TV.  But I also know that, if I submit to these temptations regularly, not only will I have wasted that amount of time (usually hours), but I also will have gained a considerable amount of weight while doing so! Just as I must have self-control in this area of my life, so must it be in all other areas of life.  The Lord put specific parameters on our lives for us to abide by so that we may have the most fulfilling life on this earth as possible and, practically speaking, so that we might be safe in the process.

But practicing self-control is HARD.  Saying “no” is HARD. And why is that? The reason is that when we give into temptation, it feels good for the first few minutes and is much easier than saying “no”. Eating that extra piece of delicious chocolate is satisfying. Saying “yes” to that guy feels exciting in the moment. But, as we’ve all figured out at this point, very soon after the excitement wears off, we realize how wrong we were, and we are left with a void to fill-the same void we had before.

When I was kid, I was very active, playing outside with my friends all day, no matter the heat.  When I would get thirsty, I went to the refrigerator and gulped down a Coke as fast as I could.  While the coldness of the Coke was refreshing and the zip of the carbonation exciting to my palate, it never completely satisfied my thirst. Have you ever noticed that? When you are really, really thirsty and you grab anything besides pure water, your thirst doesn’t seem to be quenched? In fact, although your stomach might be full of liquid, your tongue seems to scream for more.

How true is it also when we reach for anything outside of a relationship with Jesus Christ to satisfy us? Jesus Christ said in Matthew 5:6,

Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied.

And consider this poignant verse from the book of Isaiah,

Why do you spend money for what is not bread, and your wages for what does not satisfy? Listen carefully to Me, and eat what is good, and delight yourself in abundance. Isaiah 55:2

Start reaching for Jesus Christ to fulfill your thirst and “just say ‘no’” to any other second-rate alternative.

About the Writer:
Natalie is a stay at home mom to a 2 year old and has another one on the way. She occasionally works as an emergency room nurse and is studying to become a Nurse Practitioner. She and her husband have been called into the medical mission field and are excited to see what the Lord has in store for their lives.

 

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The Calling of Gentleness

Look in the news, or on popular Christian social media accounts and blogs, or even just just down the pew.  You will find Christians who disagree on everything from politics to social issues, to the interpretation of the book of Revelation.  Sincere Christians don’t agree on everything.  What governs how we respond to other Christians when we don’t agree?  What is our primary purpose?

Ephesians 4:1-3  implores us to:

 . . . walk in a manner worthy of the calling with which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness with patience, showing tolerance for one another in love being diligent to preserve the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.

We are to remember that all Christians are part of one body.  Despite our differences we have one Lord.  What a precious gift!

We can’t endorse a false peace that tells the oppressed to be quiet in the name of unity, but we can work to preserve the unity of the Spirit by being gentle – gentle with the hurts of others; gentle to the friend at church that tells you they were crushed by the way someone you respect treated them; gentle to the single mom who feels condemned by the sermon on marriage; gentle to the friend who feels like their views on social issues are scorned by their fellow Christians; gentle to the spouse who disagrees with you on what living out faith looks like in your household.  Gentle looks like saying, “I see you and your hurts, and I’m going to come along side you and bear your burden with you.”  We can encourage and edify, but it’s probably most important first to empathize.  Weep with those who weep (Romans 12:15).  Make no mistake.  We can disagree sharply on important issues, but we should never let that disagreement distract us from the fact that we agree on the most important issue:  that we need Jesus and He is our savior. When we are gentle, we communicate our relationship with Jesus Christ and that His mercy triumphs over judgement (James 2:13).

Gentleness does the work of the Lord in relationships in a way our own bravado cannot.  Ask the Lord how you can walk in a manner worthy of the calling with which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness.

About the Writer:
Caroline is a wife and mom who loves Jesus. She also has a career in commercial real estate investing. God has given her a heart for encouraging other women. She and her husband, Eric, are the directors of the Fellowship Class, a young married Sunday School class, at First Baptist Dallas.

 

Raw and in Need of Wisdom

People are messy. I’m not talking peanut-butter-in-the-hair kind of messy, although sometimes that happens. I’m talking about the someone-pouring-out-her-heart-and-letting-friends-into-her-personal-world kind of messy. I was chatting with a friend one day and we exchanged prayer requests. A few hours later I looked at her and said, “Okay, now what’s your REAL prayer request?” Then the true conversation began and I got a glimpse into her heart.

Life’s valleys can be lonely, so let’s all open the doors of our hearts a little wider to let in some conversations that might be a little tarnished and a lot raw. Let’s be willing to hear the deep groaning of our friends’ souls. Prepare your heart and your mind with the truth of God’s word so that you are equipped to redirect their needs and their worries to Him.

Community is a beautiful gift that God has given us, but it comes with warnings and a need for wisdom. We all bring our own perspectives and some baggage from past hurts. By allowing others to be close to us, we expose weaknesses and we test our patience. To build meaningful community and serve one another, we will undoubtedly encounter friction. In these moments, gentleness becomes crucial for persevering in our relationships.

In times of dissension in relationships in my own life, I return to this passage in James about Godly wisdom.

Who among you is wise and understanding? Let him show by his good behavior his deeds in the gentleness of wisdom… For where jealousy and selfish ambition exist, there is disorder and every evil thing. But the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, reasonable, full of mercy and good fruits, unwavering, without hypocrisy.(James 3:13, 16-17)

Each of these descriptors of wisdom reigns in a portion of my natural reaction, until my response becomes kind and graceful. This power-packed verse is a reminder of how desperate we are for God’s wisdom in our daily lives. And in our seeking for this gentle and peaceable wisdom, it’s important to remember “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and the knowledge of the Holy One is understanding.” (Proverbs 9:10)

About the Writer:
Audra has a passion for encouraging women in their roles at home in both marriage and motherhood. She enjoys sharing her journey of refinement and learning through these important transitions on her blog called The Homegrown Project.

 

Strong Hand With a Soft Touch

I use to dream of being gentle. Then I was hurt. Again. Again. Again. I wanted to be mean. I wanted to be heard. If not for the grace of God, I would be that person still. Then entered the gentleness of God (1 Kings 19:12) like a soft breeze speaking words of truth and direction.
God, among other things, is gentle. He was described as gentle by the prophet Isaiah (Isaiah 40:11). Jesus even called Himself “gentle” (Matthew 11:29) and said those who are gentle are blessed (Matthew 5:5). He called us to be gentle (Ephesians 4:2). He said gentleness is an expression of the fruit of God’s Spirit in the life of a believer (Galatians 5:23).
What then makes the gentleness of God possible for Him and difficult for us? For me, it is desiring my gentleness to be rewarded—naively holding onto something like a chimera, the idea that, if I am thoughtful and kind enough to someone else, he will be happy and never do me harm—quite different from God’s calling to walk in gentleness.
When Christ showed gentleness, most people were mocking Him, spitting on Him, saying false things about Him, even crucifying Him. Yet, He was gentle. When Apostle Paul said, in Philippians 4:5, “Let your gentle spirit be known to all men. The Lord is near,” he was in prison. In 1 Peter chapter 3, where Peter was urging wives to be gentle in their attitudes and behaviors to their husbands, it was amidst an exhortation to women with unbelieving husbands. None of those situations promise a change of heart or a good response from the ones we are called to show gentleness to. 
Someone once said that “gentleness is a strong hand with a soft touch.” It is the ability to speak the truth in love, guarding overtones and expressions so that the truth might be more easily received. It is a tender, compassionate approach toward others’ weaknesses and limitations. 
So why do it? Why not speak the truth without love? Why not close one’s heart when it hurts so deeply? Why put up with someone else’s weaknesses when you could even more easily abandon ship? Why not write off others’ faults as “their” problem? The answer is clear! Do not think for a moment that you can experience the abundance of the kingdom of God while walking in opposition to Him (Galatians 5). 
The promise in the Beatitudes for the gentle is that they will inherit the earth. And, in Psalm 37, this promise is again repeated: 
Rest in the Lord and wait patiently for Him;
Do not fret because of him who prospers in his way,
Because of the man who carries out wicked schemes.
Cease from anger and forsake wrath;
Do not fret; it leads only to evildoing.
For evildoers will be cut off,
But those who wait for the Lord, they will inherit the land.
Yet a little while and the wicked man will be no more;
And you will look carefully for his place and he will not be there.
But the humble will inherit the land
And will delight themselves in abundant prosperity…
Wait for the Lord and keep His way,
And He will exalt you to inherit the land;
When the wicked are cut off, you will see it. (Psalm 37:7-11, 34)
If the hope of God’s faithfulness to a courageous woman who trusts in the Lord is not enough, if rising up to the example set by Christ Himself is not enough, if compassion towards the weaknesses of another sinful human being is not enough, ask God to whisper His Word in your heart…”A bruised reed He will not break and a dimly burning wick He will not extinguish; He will faithfully bring forth justice” (Isaiah 42:3).
About the Writer:
Lyndsay has been many things in her past, but no career, experience, or calling define her more than the desire to follow after Christ in response to His gracious work in her life. At present, she teaches movement classes and works as a wellness consultant in addition to loving her amazing husband and raising her daughter to know and love the Lord.

Gentleness

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness,gentleness, self-control; against such things, there is no law. Now those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. Galatians 5:22-24

One such quality that derives from the Holy Spirit’s work in a believer’s life is that of gentleness. This particular attribute carries much influence in mirroring our Lord Jesus while expressing its effectiveness daily.  I do not remember a time, when leaving the presence of an individual who displayed gentleness, remaining unaffected.

The sphere of influence which gentleness displays is spirit-led and incredibly impactful. We are called to express this attribute through

  1. How we walk.
  2. How we express ourselves to others.
  3.  How we correct those who are in opposition.
  4.  How we defuse a matter with another person.
  5.  How we deal with a brother or sister who is in sin.

Through Gentleness, we are implored to walk in this way:

Therefore I, the prisoner of the Lord, implore you to walk in a manner worthy of the calling with which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, showing tolerance for one another in love, being diligent to preserve the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace. (Ephesians 4:1-3 NASB)

Through Gentleness we are to express ourselves to others:

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, rejoice!  Let your gentle spirit be known to all men. The Lord is near. (Philippians 4:4-5 NASB)

Through Gentleness we are to correct those who are in opposition:

The Lord’s bond-servant must not be quarrelsome, but be kind to all, able to teach, patient when wronged, with gentleness correcting those who are in opposition, if perhaps God may grant them repentance leading to the knowledge of the truth, and they may come to their senses and escape from the snare of the devil, having been held captive by him to do his will. (2 Timothy 2:24-26 NASB)

Through Gentleness we are to diffuse a matter with another person:

A gentle answer turns away wrath, But a harsh word stirs up anger. (Proverbs 15:1 NASB)

Through Gentleness we are to deal with a brother or a sister who are in sin:

Brethren, even if anyone is caught in any trespass, you who are spiritual, restore such a one in a spirit of gentleness; each one looking to yourself, so that you too will not be tempted. (Galatians 6:1 NASB)

Gentleness is the result of the Holy Spirit’s Work in our lives.

The Holy Spirit works in the heart of man to create an attitude of gentleness. In surrendering to His control in the process of such a production, we must make a decision to put it on as a garment of obedience, daily. For in “doing life” with others, gentleness will always reflect Jesus’ heart, while our flesh will reflect our own sinful desires.

About the Writer:
Shea is the mother of two and nana of four and enjoys both roles tremendously. She also loves the opportunity to serve through ministry and share through speaking and blogging. A member of First Baptist Church, Dallas, Shea serves with the church’s First Impressions ministry and teaches the Strong & Courageous Sunday School class for single moms. She also speaks to women’s groups, assists with biblical counseling when opportunities arise and is constantly working to develop women’s Bible studies. Shea received her bachelor’s degree in Christian Ministry from Blue Mountain College in Blue Mountain, Mississippi; her master’s degree in Biblical Counseling from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas; and will begin her doctoral work at Southwestern in family ministries in the fall.

Great is Your Faithfulness

 

It doesn’t take long to realize that nothing we see stays the same.  A trip to the beach illustrates this as the coastline changes yearly.

Also obvious, is change in people.  Don’t babies change seemingly overnight?  Consider a high school reunion’s effect: “Tell me the truth, do I really look that old?”  No one remains physically unchanged. No human always behaves consistently.  Even the most dependable disappoint.

Some people experience change through betrayal or divorce.  The sweetest relationships endure unintentional mistakes, and, inevitably, loss through death.

The Bible described a life-change: “In the land of Uz there lived a man whose name was Job.  This man was blameless and upright; he feared God and shunned evil.” (Job 1:1 NIV)  Job was enormously wealthy and had ten children.

Unknown to Job, God asked Satan, “Have you considered my servant Job?  There is no one on earth like him.” (Job 1:8 NIV)  Satan stated the only reason Job feared God was that God had blessed him.  If you take away what he has, Satan suggested, he will surely curse you “to your face.” (Job 1:11b NIV)

God allowed Satan to destroy all of Job’s wealth, children, and health.  After devastating loss, Job responded as follows: “Shall we accept good from God, and not trouble?’  (Job 2:10 NIV)  In all this, Job did not sin in what he said.”

We wonder at Job’s faithfulness.  Many struggle to cling to faith under far fewer  difficulties.  However, Job’s response to three friends who came to explain why he was suffering revealed his secret. (Job 19:26 NIV) declares, “ . . . after my skin has been destroyed, yet in my flesh I will see God.”  Job’s faithfulness was based on his understanding of God’s faithfulness, not on his own performance or ability to explain what was happening.

Job declared finally, “My ears had heard of You but now my eyes have seen You.” (Job 42:5 NIV)  This echoes the words of Jesus in (Matthew 5:8 NIV),  “Blessed are the pure in heart, for they will see God.”  When change rips our faith away from things that won’t last anyway, our wandering hearts are purified by recognizing Who remains worthy of our faith.  Our hearts are finally able to find rest in the absolute faithfulness of God.

The Lord’s lovingkindnesses indeed never cease,
For His compassions never fail.
They are new every morning;
Great is Your faithfulness.  Lamentations 3:22-23

About the Writer:
Nan Haines is so grateful to belong to God’s people. She loves getting to know all kinds of people and enjoys discovering new places, which is a good thing since she’s moved twenty five times. She has been married to Jim, a pastor, for 34 years, and together they have four grown kids, a son in love, and three grand puppies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finding Success In God’s Economy

Do you ever have those moments when God reveals glimpses of your future self? When I stop and close my eyes, I see a woman who is poised and gracious and who reminds me of all the women that I love and admire most in my life. I see time beautifully written in the creases of my face and hands – evidence of a life well lived.

Our time on this earth can be somewhat of a mystery, as we journey from one season to another continually searching for our path. In the struggle of accepting each new season, I find peace and direction in the Psalm below.

Trust in the LORD and do good; Dwell in the land and cultivate faithfulness. Psalm 37:3

With words like “dwell” and “cultivate”, I’m encouraged to settle in and invest in each new setting in which I find myself. The word “cultivate” is deep and very physical. It’s a call to work consistently and diligently with our hands, even when the fruits are yet unseen. We are not to worry about the results of our work, but we are called only to work in faithfulness for the glory of God. He will take care of the rest. Faith is living without a necessity for understanding. It’s living today as though the promises of tomorrow have already been met.

I’ve used the talents and passions that God has given me in many different capacities. Yet I’ve never quite felt that any of the outputs had long-standing purpose worth continuing. I’ve struggled to figure out what I was ‘supposed’ to be doing with my time and energy.

As members of the millennial generation, our expectations are accelerated and unquenchable because of lists like the “Forbes 30 under 30” and the grandiose lifestyles presented on social media. Sometimes we become so engrossed by others’ success that we fail to take steps forward in our own lives. Feeling as if we have already missed the boat, we often just sit on the dock and watch.

This generation values numbers that mean nothing in God’s economy. Thankfully, my status in heaven is not measured by the most likes or followers, but instead it is weighed on the scales of faithfulness. So, in the spirit of faithfulness, let us each live with no regrets, whether or not we see the fruits in our own life time.

Rather than feeling that we need to choose one single path which leads us into a narrow scope of a calling, I propose that we adopt an illustration of our lives as nets cast wide and open. We can dabble in this and that, all with the purpose of bringing glory to God. What if all of these small tasks done in faithfulness add up to something grand in God’s economy?

May everything we do be in service of the fact that, regardless of the size of our ministry here on earth, God has given us talents that are unique and essential in His plan. We are stewards of these gifts, and may we all strive to hear him say

“ . . . . well done, good and faithful servant” (Matthew 25:23a)NKJV.

So, go ahead! Cast your nets and use your many talents!

About the Writer:
Audra has a passion for encouraging women in their roles at home in both marriage and motherhood. She enjoys sharing her journey of refinement and learning through these important transitions on her blog called The Homegrown Project.

By Faith . . .

God says that faith is the one thing that is required for us to enter into Heaven.(Ephesians 2:8) That’s it. This is a simple concept but we as humans often try to complicate it. By trusting (having faith) that Jesus Christ died on the cross for our sins so that we wouldn’t have to pay the price for our blunders, we can have eternal life in paradise.  I believe that complicating the simplicity of salvation enough to steer people away from it is Satan’s ultimate goal.  But God’s Word says over and over again how faith in Jesus Christ and what He has done for us is the most important of all.

Hebrews 11:6a  And without faith it is impossible to please Him (God) . . . 

Jesus Christ emphasized the importance of faith in His time here on earth. Oftentimes when He healed someone, He referenced the person’s faith in relation to their healing. (Mark 2:5), (Luke 5:20), (Luke 7:50), (Luke 8:48), (Luke 17:19), (Luke 18:42)  And that’s just a sample of the references!

Here are a few more key facts about faith:

  • Faith requires patience as it always responds to God on God’s own timing and conditions. (Hebrews 6:12)
  • The testing of faith produces perseverance. (James 1:3)
  • Faith enables us to  encourage one another as believers. (Romans 1:12)

Faith ultimately means that we believe God exists and that He rewards us. We expect him to work in our lives and bless us all the time. Real faith doesn’t need to know all the details.  After all, Abraham and Sarah didn’t know why they were traveling and Noah didn’t know when the flood was to happen.  These pioneers of faith knew only that God had told them to “go” or “do”.  In fact, did you realize that Abraham and Sarah did not ever arrive to a place where they would call home? From the time he was called by God to leave his homeland, Abraham was continually traveling.  Having true faith also means recognizing that, as Christians, we are living in this world as in a temporary “rent home.”

All these died in faith, without receiving the promises, but having seen them and having welcomed them from a distance, and having confessed that they were strangers and exiles on the earth. Hebrews 11:13

Okay, so we believe – now what?  Good question!  James 2:17  has the answer, “Even so faith, if it has no works, is dead, being by itself.”  Faith without action is dead! Remember the popular line from the movie Field of Dreams, “If you build it, they will come?”  Well that quote is also implying, “If you don’t build it, they won’t come!”  If we don’t live as though we believe in Jesus Christ and acknowledge Him as Lord over our lives; we are not being a good example to others and may be a hindrance to them. By not acting out our faith, we are useless in building God’s kingdom and making disciples, which He specifically asks us to do.  Put your faith to work and watch God do incredible things in your life and the life of everyone around you.

About the Writer:
Natalie is a stay at home mom to two young boys. Additionally, she occasionally works as an emergency room nurse and is studying to become a Nurse Practitioner. She and her husband have been called into the medical mission field and are excited to see what the Lord has in store for their lives.

Great is Your Faithfulness

The Lord’s lovingkindnesses indeed never cease, For His compassions never fail. They are new every morning; Great is Your faithfulness. (Lamentations 3:22-23 NASB)

Have you ever heard the expression, “Back to the Potter’s house we go?” I have and have also experienced first-hand its true meaning. At one point in my journey, not only was God bringing a restoration most amazing to my life, but also a divine reshaping.

The word which came to Jeremiah from the Lord saying,“Arise and go down to the potter’s house, and there I will announce My words to you.” Then I went down to the potter’s house, and there he was, making something on the wheel.  But the vessel that he was making of clay was spoiled in the hand of the potter; so he remade it into another vessel, as it pleased the potter to make. Then the word of the Lord came to me saying, Can I not, O house of Israel, deal with you as this potterdoes?” declares the Lord. “Behold, like the clay in the potter’s hand, so are you in My hand, O house of Israel. (Jeremiah 18:1-6 NASB)

Jeremiah was soon to receive a staggering message from God, as he monitored the work of a potter working on a vessel. As he quietly observed the potter’s production, a change was about to take place. The clay had become spoiled in the hands of the potter.  However, with certainty, the potter would not leave the vessel in such disarray. “So he remade it into another vessel, as it pleased the potter to make” (Jer. 18:4).

The clay in this passage refers to the children of Israel, who had strayed from God. The Potter is the Lord Himself. And even though the clay was spoiled, it pleased the Lord to remake His children into a new vessel.

This story captivates my heart immensely for I, too, was marred clay. I had two choices during this particular season of my life. I would either be shaped by my circumstances or refashioned by the Potter Himself. I chose to surrender my life to His care.

From years of sinful dwellings, I never imagined that a Holy God would desire to place me back on His wheel to refashion. Yet He did.  And, even though I had no idea at the time what all that would entail, I knew one thing for sure; I was loved by a faithful God.

Remember, damaged clay in the hands of God can become His masterpiece.

About the Writer:
Shea is the mother of two and nana of four and enjoys both roles tremendously. She also loves the opportunity to serve through ministry and share through speaking and blogging. A member of First Baptist Church, Dallas, Shea serves with the church’s First Impressions ministry and teaches the Strong & Courageous Sunday School class for single moms. She also speaks to women’s groups, assists with biblical counseling when opportunities arise and is constantly working to develop women’s Bible studies. Shea received her bachelor’s degree in Christian Ministry from Blue Mountain College in Blue Mountain, Mississippi; her master’s degree in Biblical Counseling from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas; and will begin her doctoral work at Southwestern in family ministries in the fall.

Halt: Four Ways to Avoid a Panic Attack

Have you ever felt so afraid you were unable to breathe?  Have the worries and busyness of this world ever weighed heavily on your mind?  Does Satan really ever attack you in your weak spots (those things we worry most about) to try to destroy your joy?

A few months ago, after an exceedingly hard week both physically and emotionally, I experienced a panic attack in which I could not breathe, felt like I was choking, and my heart was filled with fear. I paced the house, moved from my comfortable bed to the couch, and on to an upstairs bedroom. Still restless, I drank a glass of milk, read my Bible, repeated verses aloud, but nothing seemed to help. Fear gripped at my heart, telling me I was incapable of doing anything.  After about three hours of what felt like wrestling with Satan, and finally convinced that I would just quit everything in which I was involved when morning came, sleep finally overtook me.

The next morning, with the dawning of day, the thought came that this might have been an attack from the Deceiver, the Father of Lies, or Satan; but in the darkness of night I was unable to drive him away. With daylight came ease of mind, peace, and strength from the truth of scripture that I can do all things through Christ (Philippians 4:13)  and refreshment in the promises of His word and deliverance from all my fears (Psalms 34:4), (Psalms 34:7)  I realized how very small from God’s perspective my worries really were and that he was in control of it all. (Psalm 103:19)

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High
Will abide in the shadow of the Almighty.
I will say to the Lord, “My refuge and my fortress,
My God, in whom I trust!”
For it is He who delivers you from the snare of the trapper
And from the deadly pestilence.

 He will cover you with His pinions,
And under His wings you may seek refuge;
His faithfulness is a shield and bulwark.

You will not be afraid of the terror by night,
Or of the arrow that flies by day;
Of the pestilence that stalks in darkness,
Or of the destruction that lays waste at noon. Psalms 91:1-6

Dr. Charles Stanley, from In Touch Ministries, has quoted four ways to keep ourselves from getting to the point of being overwhelmed. He used the acronym HALT:

  • H- Don’t let yourself get too hungry, take care of your physical body.
  • A- Don’t let yourself get too angry,  or emotionally distraught,
  • L- Don’t let yourself get too lonely,
  • T-  Don’t let yourself get too tired.

Even though I may never know if a spiritual battle was actually going on during my restless night (Ephesians 6:12),  these things I do know:

  • God, the Creator, and great Shepherd (Psalm 23) is able to take care of all of our needs, whether it be physical, financial, emotional, relational or otherwise.
  • We are not to fear.  Dr Robert Jeffress, pastor of First Baptist Dallas, says there are 365 verses in the Bible instructing us to not fear.  (God knew there are times I would need one for every day!)

 Do not fear, do not anxiously look about you, for I am your God. Isaiah 41:10

About the Writer:
Beverly has been an educator, administrator, educational sales representative, Sunday school teacher, and mentor; but most importantly is a wife, mother, and grandmother with a passion for sharing Christ by serving as Coordinator for Yada Yada.